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intense competitive environment. the name of the new carrier expected to be american airlines. >>> all right. that's going to do it for biz this hour. we'll see what's going on with the markets. >>> a people tested by politics and history. innovators whose technology spread about the world. artists who captured the imagination of audiences everywhere. these are the faces of south korea. nhk world updates you on what's happening across the peninsula wednesday and thursday here on "newsline." >>> in south korea men over the age of 19 must serve two years in the military. famous actors and singers are no exception. recently several korean stars now doing their required military service performed in a musical that turned out to be a big hit. ♪ >> reporter: the promise had a ten-day run in seoul. it's about the korean war started when north korea attacked the south in 1950. many actors and singers in this military musical actually serve on active duty right now. yunok, for example, led the k-pop group before he was drafted. service members like him are called entertainment soldiers. seven
that they are in a safe environment. >> i'm very concerned. because if it can happen to him, it can happen to anybody else. you know, if the person who took his life wasn't scared to do it, they could do it to anybody. >> reporter: this murder will be the focus of a special campus wide meeting tomorrow. in fact, the school has canceled classes for one hour so that all students, faculty, and staff can attend. at ume, derek valcourt, wjz eyewitness news. >> maryland state police say police were offering a $2,000 reward for information that helps lead to an arrest. >>> weerm, following a-- wjz, following a developing story. a johns hopkins doctor, under investigation by city police, is dead. denise has details in the newsroom for us. >> reporter: 54-year-old nikita levy's body was found at his home in towson. police tell us the former johns hopkins gynecologist was under investigation for secretly recording patients. according to police, earlier this month, levy was fired by hopkins, when another employee reported the allegations to hopkins security staff. in a stat
constrained environment. these challenges combined with these destabilizing effects of terrorist and critical networks will make general rodriquez' task at africom among the most complicated in the department. an additional matter in the africom aor is committee watches closely is the ongoing u.s. support operations in central africa to assist the multinational effort to remove joseph kony and his top lieutenants from the battlefield. this committee and general inhofe has been very active in this effort and assad to ensure that this mission is adequately resourced including additional intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. general rodriquez i know you are familiar with this mission and the committee looks forward to hearing from you about it and to working with you on it and so many of the other challenges he will be facing. i'm going to turn the gavel over to senator kaine who has agreed to take over because i must go to the floor and i i will call upon the senator inhofe. >> thank you mr. mr. mr. chair i join you in welcoming our witnesses. i've had an opportunity to get
places to be safer. in the short term, we can just decide to live in more urban environments. a wonderful study, you know, dick jackson famously asked the question in what sort of environment are you most likely to die in a pool of blood? that's how he puts it to his audiences. [laughter] and they compared murder by strangers, crime, to car crashes and added the two together. they looked at portland, vancouver and seattle in all three places, you were 15% safer in the grittiest inner city than the leafy suburbs because of the connell by nation of the two. -- combination of the two. and then finally asthma. who talk abouts about asthma? fourteen americans die every day from asthma. okay, that doesn't sound like a huge amount. it's three times the rate of the '90s and it's entirely due to motor exhaust. the sickest places in america are those places which are the most car dependent. and, you know, in phoenix you've got four months out of the year that healthy people are not supposed to leave their houses because of the amount of driving that's going on. so, again, what's the solution? the c
revenue. it will need to be done in an environment where as we broaden the base, we both contribute to deficit reduction and hopefully are able to lower rates. on the business side, we have a contradiction in our fiscal tax system. our statutory rate is high. our effective rate is not as high. when you look at the united states against other countries, it the statutory rate makes the u.s. look unattractive compared to others. for individual firms, their average tax rate is much lower because of all of the complicated provisions that are part of the code now. it would be a challenge to take on those individual credit. there's no way way to bring the rate down. that is something i think we need to do to maintain competitiveness abroad. >> you still believe that going down the road we need to reduce that to get the rate down? >> i do. when one looks at a table of international tax rates, it stands up at u.s. statutory rate is high. it is a complicated story to tell that the average rate is lower. it does not affect all businesses equally. we need a simpler tax code. >> could you briefl
to work in that environment because we don't have great intelligence on these organizations. we don't know what we are doing in afghanistan and we don't know what we are doing in iraq. islamic we don't know how to go in or how to get out. >> and we have learned that. >> one last question, since you have security clearance when you make a speech or write a book to you have to have clearance? >> who asked that question? i want to speak to you afterwards. i've never submitted any speech or article. this book was submitted these are suggestions or called for. i made some and provided footnotes to display with others and i challenged the ones that i thought had nothing to do with classified material and never heard anything again. laughter irca of 63 very much. [applause] >> a great way to leave it. [applause] >> thank you very much for the session. islamic we will have book signings and the library. >> former treasury secretary working on the u.s. financial crisis as well as his tenure as the president of the federal reserve bank of new york. a website for but recommendations and sales has lau
, transportation, labor and new directors for small business administration, environment patrol text agency and bureau of comeback, and fire arms. this could be the bumpiest. critics say he has not complied with the basic document requests. what is going on with that? >> hagel was supposed to hand over formal speeches from 2008 on. colleague rosen uncovered two speeches on the arab-israeli that he did not disclose. some of the speeches before 2008 when he was a senator were pro arab group including some at time were hostile to israel. they have gone above and beyond the document request and this is not part of what was canned for. separately, brennan has serious democratic critics who threatened to hold up his nomination over the role of the enhanced interrogation technique like water boarding and drone attacks. >> bret: thank you. his full post on foxnews.com by the way. stocks began the week on a down note. dow lost 22. the s&p 500 was off one. nasdaq dropped two. government said at least one in five consumers, one in five, has an error on the credit report. the federal trade commission s
is the ranking member of the arms services committee, member on the committee of environment and public works as well, and, senator, good to have you with us. you and senator reid, the majority leader, failing to come to terms on a whole, collins withdrawing her vote, and we have a 60-vote threshold for the first time ever. is that what you wanted? >> well, first of all, i hope you are right, lou, because the last time i heard, senator collins was going to support senator hagel. if you are right, that makes a difference in where we are today. i want to correct something that you said, of course, you were quoting senator reid. this is not the first time in history this has happened. it happens all the time. on the floor today in the senate, i talked about kathleen sebelius. she did it, the same exact thing happened, and when harry reid, back on the republican side, he -- one of them that he demanded to have a 60-vote threshold. john bryson, secretary of commerce, he was required to have a 60-vote. this is not a bill buster, but saying you have to file cloture in order to get this on the floor
to filibuster. dick durbin said at the time: cenk: positive environment, the republicans aren't going to filibuster anymore. they got a deal, so we didn't have to take it away. what happened today when senator hagel, a republican up for secretary of defense? the republicans filibustered. >> on this vote, the aye58 the nays 40, one senator announced present. 50% of the senators not having voted in the affirmative, the motion is not agreed to. cenk: even though 58 senators say yes let's end the debate and confirm him nope, not going to end the debate, because the republicans filibustering. now harry reid is shocked to find out that the republicans were not true to their word! >> the republicans have made an unfortunate choice to up the level here in washington. just when you thought things couldn't get worse, it gets worse. we need this vote today. why? times like this, it's nice to have a secretary of defense. cenk: man, harry reid, oh, you're killing 'em you're killing 'em take it easy, brother. this is the guy who gave it away earlier, allowing them to filibuster in the first place.
knowledge, understanding the environment in which you are operating, communication and motivational skills, they are challenging, but they are in powering, rock-solid integrity, unusual determination, perseverance and perseverance. as you might guess, a great admirer of dr. rice, not quite as much as moamar ghadaffi. i don't have the scrapbook. [laughter] [applause] but i do have an enormous regard for dr. rice and i am jury pleased that she is here to do her formal introductions and i would like to invite the ambassador cobb to the stage. [applause] >> good morning everybody. thank you, president shalala, and my life for those nice comments. before i introduce condoleezza rice, i want to share with all of you if favoritism that i have, a bias that i have come and this is that i have a strong affinity for smart, strong, powerful, successful and charismatic leaders. as evidence of that -- [applause] as evidence of that, i have been married to one of those lease for 52 years. [applause] but a second evidence of that i had the pleasure to chair the search committee for the university of miami
closest ally. but refusing the pipeline and not building it would have zero effect on the environment. canadians stumbled on the largest reserve of shale oil around. they're the saudi arabia of shale. they are not going to keep it in the ground if we don't input it. it will go to china. say said so. it has zero effect on the climate, global warming whatever you want. the fact that obama is still mulling over there -- i understand last year he wanted to hold the left wing base. he wanted re-election. but now? after he has won re-election? it shows how -- if he refuses it, which i think is possible, it will show how partisan considerations way outweigh the national interest. it would be shocking. >> bret: secretary kerry, now secretary of state, said an announcement will come in the near term saying it won't be long. near term is what he said, juan. how do you think it will go? >> i think they are leaning toward approving it. i think it's a real disappointment for that is the case for so many people, young people who pour in to town over the weekend to proto protest this. they are conce
% of business owners that were surveyed identified the current environment as a bad time to expand and political uncertainty topped the list for the reasons not to attempt economic growth. lee, a resident of muskogee, oklahoma, and president of acme corporation, said a lot of small businesses had to go in debt to stay afloat. he said now they can't make the money they need to to pay down debts due in large part the environment the government has created. i joined a small group of members in congress. i have faced unprecedented difficulties ensuring my business succeeded. i step on the floor of the united states house of representatives with a firsthand understanding how high the hurdles are for a business to succeed and just simply jump over. last month when president obama was sworn into his second term, i was reminded of something he said four years ago in his first inauguration. the president said, "the question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small but whether it works, whether it helps families finds a job at a decent wage, care they can afford or retirement tha
, the environment would be destroyed, the world would come to an end by us building that pipeline. you know, we're multiple decades past. it's worked very well. there haven't been those disasters that people claimed. but on top of that, i know my friend from louisiana mentioned the environmental impact, and, you know, that it makes sense, the pipeline is the safest way to move oil but on top of that, you have a choice and the senator from north dakota made it very clear, that is you get the -- to refine it in china or the u.s. i don't know about anybody here but i would bet we all agree between the environmental standards, we have a better environmental record than china does in refinery and refining of oil products. so it makes sense for us to do it here. on top of that, i know and, again, from alaska which people travel there not just for the jobs and opportunity but the beauty of alaska. we have more visitors who want to see the pipeline, to visit the pipeline. when i went down on a rafting trip you're in nowhere land. unbelievable beauty but one of the last things you see when you come down
in the environment. the obama administration put off deciding whether to okay the project until after the presidential election. the state department says a final decision on the pipeline could come this spring. one scientist at the kato institute predicts the president will green light the pipeline. >> i think the white house has probably made its decision on keystone. the political calculus is obvious. if they come out against, it they are going to pay a very big price. >> president obama talked about climate change in his state of the union address last week, but he did not specifically mention the keystone xl pipeline. christi. >> all right. emily, thank you so much. >>> robert kennedy jr. was among those protesting the keystone pipeline. he was even arrested during a demonstration outside the white house this past week. we'll get his perspective on the message that he's trying to send to the president. that's coming up in a couple of minutes. >>> want to get you to vatican city and pope benedict's farewell tour. he spoke in several languages in st. peter's square and he got to sp
to thank our chairman on the environment and public works committee, chairman boxer, for the briefing she held today with a number of scientists, including one who spoke specifically about the human health effects that we can see from climate change. climate change is threatening to erode the improvements in air quality that we have achieved through the clean air act. e.p.a. enforced emissions reductions have led to a decline in the number and severity of bad air days in the united states. these are the days that -- i know the presiding officer is familiar with because i'm sure they happen in connecticut as well as in rhode island -- where the air quality is so poor that it's unhealthy for sensitive individuals -- the elderly, infants, people with breathing difficulties -- to be outdoors. even healthy people are urged to limit their activities when out of doors. in rhode island, about 12% of children and 11% of adults suffer from asthma. both are higher than the national average. our rhode island public transit authority runs free buses on bad ozone days to try to keep car traffic down be
of 43% trust republicans with gun policy. on the issue of the environment, 55% trust president obama more. foreign policy, it is 51% to 37%. theresa, nevada. caller: regarding president obama using executive orders to go around the republicans in the house, i am all for it. i am aware that this is a two- party democracy and we need republicans to be reasonable working party, but they have not been. the president has no choice but to go around them. john boehner has walked away. i am frustrated and the country is frustrated, other democrats are frustrated and scared. i am scared of the things they're willing to do to our country. he is doing what he has to do. i am all for his proposals, all for clean energy and comprehensive immigration, i am for gun legislation. i am for all of them. i am center-left, that is progressive. i think the country is definitely going progressive. i do not understand where the republicans want to obstruct and go with their small mindedness and small government proposals that they think that they can push through on the american people that i do not think a
dialogue about communities and their work to promote better emotional health and creating environments for young people and their families to feel comfortable asking for help. and i'm counting on america's doctors to help lead these community conversations. the care you provide for your patience will always be your first job. but today there are many other ways for doctors to make a difference in peoples lives. starting contributing to the transformation over health care system. we have made great progress in the last few years. now i look for to working on the progress and creating a health system that patients, doctors and this country deserve. thank you all for what you do each and every day. [applause] >> when edith wilson's husband, president woodrow wilson suffered a stroke in office, her role as first lady changed. i myself have made a single decision to grant the disposition of public affairs. film decision that was mine was what was important and what was not come at a very important decision of when to present matters to my husband. >> c-span's new series first ladies come in
recognizes the lucky environment and knows what to do with it. so, yeah, i'd agree with you completely. >> we're going to have to close this off. thank you. do you have any comments about petraeus coming pack to public life? >> he's not going to come back to public life, i mean, in the sense of political life? i think that in a few months you'll see him reemerging. you know, he's being advised, his career counselor the same guy who advised president clinton after his own little scrape -- [laughter] and he advises a lot of people. and he's very good at it. so i think you haven't seen the last of him, let's put it that way. >> thank you so much. >> thank you, thank you. [applause] >> watch it here on c-span2. >> good morning. stacy schiff was a wonderful biographer of, among others, cleopatra recently observed that biographers all have two lives. okay in back? can you hear? all right, good. in one realm, she says, the biographers are moving forward in ignorance. in the other you're moving backward with something resembling omniscience. now, what she doesn't say is that along with the illusion o
will, the worst of the items tested first. we just heard from the secretary of the environment saying he hopes all the testing will be done by the end of the week. the results will be done by the end of next week. it may drag into next week, michael. >> so, nic, are people still buying what they think is beef? is it dangerous if it's horse meat? >> you know, i think that the danger issue has been somewhat laid to rest. the danger was it was horse meat contaminated with a drug that prevents or sort of cures animals of pain. but in humans, it's very, very dangerous. the levels you would have to eat we were told by the government scientists would be so high, impractical, unlikely. but consumer confidence has been marked. two-thirds of people here say there's no longer sure about what's on the box as they were before. and a quarter of people say that they're going to cut down buying processed meat. and another one-fifth of people said they'd like to cut down on buying processed meat, they just can't afford to do it. so there's concern. the consumers are changing their habit based on this.
and educators saying, look, this is the kind of environment we want to establish. maybe if the school isn't singularly dedicated to bringing these students together, it's about integrating the classroom. >> if your kid is, say, gifted or talented and slowed down some way in this classroom? >> i think it's mitigated by the fact that they have tailored experience. you're getting special attention in the classroom no matter what. >> alex, thanks for the story. >>> they say you can't be a little bit pregnant. one man who tried to be, after your local news. you're getting special attention >> this is wbal-tv 11 news in baltimore. >> good morning. i am mindy basara. let's get a check on the morning commute with kim dacey. >> couple of problem spots out there. not as much volume we are used to this morning. a brush fire off to the side -- not on the roadway, but it could cause a spectacle and some rubbernecking as you go in that direction. we have a disabled vehicle here with possible lane closures as well. westminster, route 40 and 97. a few things to be aware of on the roads this morning. j.f.
in a hollow army. today the global environment is the most insert nicene in my 36 years of service. it's unpredictable and dynamic. we simply don't know when we'll have to deploy soldiers to fight egad. but history tells us that we will. we owe it to them to ensure they have the proper resources to be ready when needed. the fiscal outlook, which the u.s. army faces in fiscal year 13 is dire and to my knowledge unprecedented. in addition to the 170 billion in cuts to the army that it could budget control act of 2011, the combination of the continuing resolution, a shortfall -- excuse me, a shortfall in overseas contingency operation funds for afghanistan in the sequester in fiscal year 2013 has resulted in a 17, $18 billion shortfall to the operation and maintenance accounts. as well as an additional $6 cut to other programs. all of this will come in the remaining seven months of this year. the fiscal year at her teen fiscal situation was grave and immediate readiness impacts on all fours is not serving in an order for and korea. the impacts which will have a significant impact willing
and enjoyable learning environment for students and we've seen it in our family. our youngest daughter followed her older sister to kansas state university, now a college in vet nature medicine, another area that kansas state university is so highly regarded is the study of animal science. k-state is the western border of the animal science corridor, the eastern corridor, the university of missouri. from west to east, this corridor, the animal science corridor is bounded by the research scientists and educators and stkaols that increase the -- and schools that increase the likelihoods that americans are going to have nutrition, be well fed and a safe food supply. it is an honor to may pa*eu -- pay tribute to those at kansas state university, to make sure it remains a place of higher education and learning in our state, but also to make certain that kansas state university, manhattan, kansas, is always that place called home, where students from across our state and around the globe feel like they found a family and a place to learn and improve their lives and to make certain that they contribut
environment that would get the economy growing. if you want wages to grow -- what we've done to the middle class has been devastating. immigration will be one thing we will hopefully get to an honest understanding of the policy and the facts. you opened with a comment about the president's administration. a friend of mine admits the president that promise to be the most transparent and open to not turn out that way. i have not heard members of the left just being brutal, "you promised open government and sunlight into the workings and you did just the opposite." this is an interesting conversation. the left was brutal to the previous administration on guantanamo bay, extradition, the use of drones. that same left is almost mute when this president has gone further and broken his promises. host: speaker boehner held a press conference yesterday and said the house would not pass any sequester bills until the senate does. the speaker was tired of having legislation die. guest: we have spent two years negotiating with ourselves. we sit there and wait for the president to deliver an honest budg
with the first round of this process. the technology we are talking about, the threat environment we're talking about is too dynamic. there will be innovation and opportunity that comes along as well as folks work on this. we need an approach that can constantly improve by adapting. like we have seen in other areas this collaborative structure we set up to generate the framework can be the basis of support for this ongoing process and i think will be essential when we approach this effort in that spirit. today we are at the beginning of the beginning and what i would like to do is finish by asking for your help. this is about teamwork, this is about working together. for the framework to be effected we need to begin to engage and work together. today, on the web site, we posed a series of questions that will soon be published formally and the request for information to the public to solicit input on both the framework and the framework process. i would encourage all of you to take a look at those and begin to engage with us immediately on fat. additionally, we will be hosting a series of worksh
environment then. the average cost of a new home is $24,000. a first-class stamp is 5 cents. gas was 33 cents a gallon. in the 1960s, americans did not personal computers in their homes. today we live in an electronic age. today we are educating children for jobs that have not yet been created, using technologies that have not yet been invented. today we operate a technology driven market economy and we need a modern tax system. our tax reform proposal is revenue neutral and budget control. i know there are organizations that want to tax my services at the overall goal of growing government. these organizations want to spend our tax dollars for more government programs. that is not what mr. brascan phone and that is not what our plan is about. our goal is a better business tax climate that will create more high-paying jobs and more rewarding careers for sons and daughters. we need a tax climate that rewards middle-class families for their hard work. in the next two days, i will have legislation introduced that provides alternative options for eliminating many business sales tax exemptions tha
is managing director of resources and environment at the gao. cathleen berrick is managing director of homeland security and justice issues that the gao. philip herr of infrastructure issues at the gao. orice williams brown is managing director of financial markets, an area particular concerns in committee investment at the gao. and mr. david powner is managing systems at the gao. i'm now going to ask about to stand because if you're going to help the general come you may very well be a witness. would you please raise your right hand and pursuant to the committee roasts, please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear or affirm the testimony about to give up the truth, whole truth and nothing but the truth? let the record reflect the witnesses answered in the affirmative. normally we have the five-minute clock. for your reference will have it. if you've an overcoming of the whole show today. sachin come you recognize. >> thank you, mr. chairman. wing commander cummings, members of the committee, i'm pleased to be invited today to talk about the high-risk list the day. we do the
just had an environment that was a little more forgiving. so when i screwed up, the consequences weren't as high as when kids on the south side screw up. >> reporter: the president also took a broader approach to solving the issue of gun violation, arguing the problem is rooted in economic inequalities and broken homes. and on this point, he got personal, too. >> don't get me wrong. as the son of a single mom who gave everything she had to raise me with the help of my grandparents, i turned out okay. but at the same time, i wish i'd had a father who was around and involved. >> reporter: while this isn't the first time the president has talked about being raised by a single mom, political analysts say friday's intimate appeal may be indicative of a more aggressive president obama. now, since the tragedy in newtown, alex, president obama has been making a more emotional appeal to get stiffer gun legislation passed. that is an uphill battle he's going to have once he leaves his vacation here in florida. another fight he's going to face with congress, of course, over the sequester, those d
request an immediate end to my solitary confinement and ask to be in a unit in an open prison environment where inmates are allowed outside of their cell also for no lens 14 hours a day. i have been in solitary confinement in the u.s. since february 8th 1995 with no end in sight. i further ask not to be in handcuffs or leg irons when moved outside my cell, end quote. he reportedly claims his due process under the law is being violated because he has no chance to get out of solitary confinement despite 15 years of good behavior in prison. the lawsuit reportedly claims his time in solitary confinement has led to, quote, severe psychological trauma. no comment, though, jenna on the psychological trauma he caused to the families of six killed, and more than a thousand injured in the bombing he plotted along with al-qaida's help. back to you. jenna: fair point there to bring up. julie thank you. jon: a disturbing u.n. report detailing the rice in human rights abuses across war torn syria. according to the findings both government and rebel forces are guilty of war crimes there and the fighting
in this environment. we had to raise them because of the acuity of an economic crisis. we now have an operating balance budget for the first time in a decade. california's beginning to click back. do not count us out. >> right. you know, though, gavin, though, you have always been straightforward and i've always respected you a great deal. you're a progressive politician, but you understand what it takes to bring small businesses to california. you've been concerned about high tax rates in california for a long time. >> yeah. >> and you're exactly right. whether it's rick perry who we've made a lot of fun of over the past year. you talk about rick scott. they are obsessed with bringing jobs back to their states. and it worked. what does california do? what does new york do? what does connecticut do? what do these states do that have this high tax burden and also have a lot of debt to pay off? how do they balance that with staying competitive for the next decade? >> well, the most important thing these states do is what california and new york, to degree have done, and that's deal with solvency.
pushed to ban styrofoam in manhattan. >> it's not just terrible for the environment. it's another thing that's terrible for the taxpayers. styrofoam increases the cost of recycling by as much as $20 per ton because it has to be removed, something we know is environmentally destructive that is costing taxpayers money and that is easily replaceable, i think is something we can do without. >> joining me michael barbareau covers mayor bloomberg for "the no, times." good to see you. >> good to be here. >> he wants to take styrofoam out of new york city stores and restaurants. how feetible is th ibfeasible i? >> entirely feasible. this is like the cockroach of trash. >> the cockroach of trash. >> it never dies, it doesn't biodegrade, it breaks apart, ends up in the water system, being 20,000 tons of it in the city's landfills and he thinks it's unnecessary. >> and we think this is something that he can get done before he leaves office? >> yes. he's had a little more difficulty with banning other things like a 32-ounce soda but this one it appears can he get done through the city council which
health care environment run by the federal government in the united states. >> right. >> peter: what do people do to respond? >> you know, i actually get asked a lot. people come up to me, oh, the government did x, fill in the blank, whatever it might be. can we sue them? the answer most of the time is no, because most of what they do is addressed in elections. you don't like what they're doing, vote differently and show up and vote and not everybody does, of course. but there are a lot of times -- i mean, this is our second lawsuit with the epa where they're breaking the law. while this has been a both republican and democrat phenomenon in the past, we've never seen an administration so aggressive about it. we walk through example after example of how bigger government, federal government, is breaking the law over and over and how states are pushing back. but you asked about individuals. there are times when the state cannot step in, where it takes an individual person or an individual company to actually fight back and other americans count on those people to do that. but for a lot of
of environment we want to establish. maybe if the school isn't singularly dedicated to bringing these students together, it's about integrating the classroom. >> if your kid is, say, gifted or talented and slowed down some way in this classroom? >> i think it's mitigated by the fact that they have tailored experience. you're getting special attention in the classroom no matter what. >> alex, thanks for the story. >>> they say you can't be a little bit pregnant. one man who tried to be, after your local news. you're getting special attention >>> 8:30 now on this monday morning. it's the 18th of february, 2013. chilly day out here on our plaza. we have a lot of hardy folks who decided to come by, say hello. lots have stopped by, not the least of which, steve harvey, our co-host. >> i'm here. >> how do you like it so far? oh, come on. still thawing out? >> i love work iing outside. who thought of this? >> i know. this is our last moment outside. >> okay. >> coming up, you're going to go inside and speak to the pregnant man? >> this guy wore the suit because he wanted to see what his wife was expe
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)